The British Government is More of a Republic Than an Absolute Monarchy

It affords a violent° prejudice against almost every science, that no prudent man, however sure of his principles, dares prophesy concerning any event, or foretel the remote consequences of things.

Harrington thought himself so sure of his general principle, that the balance of power depends on that of property, that he ventured to pronounce it impossible ever to re-establish monarchy in England.

Those who assert, that the balance of our government inclines towards absolute monarchy, may support their opinion by the following reasons.

These considerations are apt to make one entertain a magnificent idea of the British spirit and love of liberty since we could maintain our free government, during so many centuries, against our sovereigns, who, besides the power and dignity and majesty of the crown, have always been possessed of much more property than any subject has ever enjoyed in any commonwealth.

On the other hand, those who maintain, that the byass of the British government leans towards a republic, may support their opinion by specious° arguments.

It may farther be said, that, though men be much governed by interest; yet even interest itself, and all human affairs, are entirely governed by opinion.

Dare I venture to deliver my own sentiments amidst these opposite arguments, I would assert, that, unless there happen some extraordinary convulsion, the power of the crown, by means of its large revenue, is rather upon the encrease.

It is well known, that every government must come to a period, and that death is unavoidable to the political as well as to the animal body.

Matters, therefore, must be trusted to their natural progress and operation.

Thus, if we have reason to be more jealous of monarchy, because the danger is more imminent from that quarter; we have also reason to be more jealous of popular government, because that danger is more terrible. This may teach us a lesson of moderation in all our political controversies.